What if others know more about my topic than me?

What if others know more about my topic than me?

Published on
November 20, 2019

Every once in a while, we doubt our own knowledge about being good enough to help others. We're held back by questions like,

"What if others know more about my topic than me?" 😟

I wanted to share a short story that will help you help others grow.

There’s a book (and a movie) called Catch Me If You Can that illustrates this point pretty well. It’s the story of a famous con artist, Frank Abagnale, a brilliant high school dropout who masqueraded as an airline pilot, a pediatrician, and a district attorney, among other things.

There is a point in the book where he starts teaching a sociology class at Brigham Young University. He teaches the whole semester, and no one ever figures out that he’s not a real teacher.

Later on, when they finally do catch him, the authorities ask, 

“How in the world did you teach that class? You don’t know anything about advanced sociology.” 👨‍🏫

He replied,

“All I had to do was read one chapter ahead of the students.” 📖

That’s the key. You don’t have to be the most knowledgeable person in the world on your topic, you just have to be one chapter ahead of the people you’re helping. There will always be people in the world who are more advanced than you. That’s fine.

You can learn from them, but don’t let it stop you from helping the ones who are a chapter or two behind you.

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